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Planning and Advice

Financial education

We can help you meet your financial goals, save for college, and prepare for retirement. Read up on these topics or use one of our calculators to brush up on the basics before visiting with your Everence representative.

Advantages of tax deferral

The federal government allows you to save for certain things on a tax-deferred basis. This means you can save for retirement without paying taxes on the money you save until you use it.

Be observant

When the value of one of your investments dips more than 10 percent in a year, it’s easy to forget that your destination is 20 years or more away. Don’t get caught up in the emotion of short-term swings in the market.

Be patient

Big things can grow from small seeds. Don’t let big numbers scare you. It’s not unusual to see costs for a college degree of $50,000 and up or retirement savings needs of $500,000 and more. It’s easy to get discouraged by numbers that big.

Be powerful

Time is one of the most powerful allies you have, no matter what your long-term savings goal. Here is one example, based on retirement.

Budgeting 101

Money is a powerful force. It has lured many unsuspecting people into debt, so it's important to take the task of money management seriously. Fortunately, with some planning you can create a plan to fit your faith and lifestyle.

Budget and debt counseling

If you are facing a difficult financial situation or need basic financial counsel about a mortgage, your credit report, or even the household budget, Everence offers a compassionate and thoughtful service that can help.

Five myths of saving for retirement

Some of the conventional wisdom about planning for retirement needs to be reexamined. As life expectancy continues to increase, we'll have to rethink what the ideal retirement age is and how big of a nest egg we need to accumulate.

More take home pay

Taking $1,000 out of your salary can sound like a big bite. If you participate in a tax-deferred savings plan, the difference you see in your paycheck will actually be much less.

Testing your tolerance for risk

Deciding how much risk you can tolerate is something only you can do. By answering these questions, you can determine what risk level you are most comfortable with.