Congregations, Everence Sharing Fund offered support after tragedy

Faith and Finance |

Two families lost loved ones in a traffic accident and received support from local congregations and the Everence Sharing Fund

The Everence Sharing Fund helped more than 2,000 households in 2014, awarding grants totaling about $873,000. And our congregational partners donated an additional $1.2 million.

But those are just numbers. The real people behind those numbers include Le Bie and Rebecca Thla Aye, whose families were devastated by a traffic accident last fall.

Le Bie and his children

Severeal congregations in North Carolina donated money to help Le Bie and his children, with the Everence Sharing Fund providing matching grants.

Le Bie’s wife, Tei Paw, and Rebecca Thla Aye’s husband, Khai Hne, were killed on their commute home from work in September 2014.

They were carpooling with four other refugees from Burma who had settled in Charlotte, North Carolina, and worked at the same retail distribution center across the state line in Fort Mill, South Carolina. One other person in their car was killed in the accident, which occurred on an interstate in South Carolina.

Le Bie has three children, ranging from in age from 3 to 13. Rebecca Thla Aye was pregnant with their second child when her husband was killed. Her children are now 3 years old and about 5 months old.

Rebecca Thla Aye and two children

Rebecca Thla Aye lost her husband, Khai Hne, in a traffic accident last fall.

Several congregations in North Carolina donated money to help Le Bie, Rebecca Thla Aye and their children, with the Everence Sharing Fund providing matching grants.

The families are members of Mara Christian Church, which is affiliating with the Virginia Mennonite Conference, noted Dan Yoder, a retired pastor in Charlotte whom the immigrants have come to rely on for information and assistance.

“The money that came in was really appreciated,” Dan said.

Everence members make it possible for the Sharing Fund to make a difference in the lives of people in communities around the corner and across the country.